December 2016 Photo Contest
Focus on Texas: Native
You don’t have to look far to find Texas originals

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    Ron Hasty, CoServ: The pyrrhuloxia is a relative of the northern cardinal.
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    Gary McAlea, Pedernales EC: A male indigo bunting at South Llano River State Park
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    Mark Holly, Bandera EC: “South of Llano are many typical Hill Country homes and ranchettes where you find scenes like this quite often in the spring,” Holly says.
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    William Gary, Bandera EC: Gary says he climbed an adjacent hill to get at eye level and used a 400-mm lens to photograph this red-shouldered hawk nestling, which was high in an oak tree on his property.
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    Emily Howard, Jackson EC: A pine tree glows beneath a Texas sunset at Martin Dies Jr. State Park near Jasper.
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    Web Extra: Marvin Patterson: A buffalo in Hunt County
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    Web Extra: Pat Dunnuck, Sam Houston EC: Crab war on Galveston beach
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    Web Extra: Linda Whitted, San Bernard EC: “This little flower is quite amazing close up.”
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    Web Extra: Debra Swierk, Upshur Rural EC: Owls in Hughes Springs
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    Web Extra: Dawn McDonald, Heart of Texas EC: Native American dancer
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    Web Extra: Louellen Coker, CoServ: This little turtle was “just hanging out on the back porch before making its way to a nearby pond,” Coker says.
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    Web Extra: Jennifer Matula, Victoria EC: “We stopped to take pictures in a patch of [pink] buttercups and found that this one held a tiny green worm,” Matula says. This flower is also called evening primrose.
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    Web Extra: Sharon Regan, Magic Valley EC: A white ibis at the South Padre Island Birding and Nature Center
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    Web Extra: Kim Prince, Rusk County EC: Peaceful sunset on Lake Murvaul
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    Web Extra: Lisa Lalumandier, Deep East Texas EC: Native switchgrass gets attached to a model of an ancient dwelling at Caddo Mounds State Historic Site near Alto.
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    Web Extra: Lisa Lalumandier, Deep East Texas EC: A butterfly has landed on a purple passionflower, also called a maypop.
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    Web Extra: Tim Dasso, Pedernales EC: On a cliff above the Pedernales River, prickly pear cactus tunas serve as Christmas ornaments for Santa.
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    Web Extra: Ricky Niell, Trinity Valley EC: Hay bale at sunrise in East Texas
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    Web Extra: Kathy Thalman, Guadalupe Valley EC: This solitary beauty grows on Thalman’s farm each year, though she’s unsure what it’s called. “It dances in the southern breeze and makes me smile,” she says.
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    Web Extra: William Gary, Bandera EC: “This shot was taken shortly after the sun came up at our residence in Mountain Valley Ranch at Medina Lake,” Gary says. Several hummingbirds, including this female black-chinned hummingbird, are frequent visitors to the firebrush and shrimp plants that thrive in the hot Texas sun.
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    Web Extra: Shannan Brent, Bluebonnet EC: Closeup of a cactus at Muleshoe Bend Recreation Area

We love our transplants, but native Texans are a breed all our own—and proud of it! Whether Texas is your native soil, or you got here as quickly as you could, stick around to see the wildlife, objects and people with deep Lone Star roots.